highroad : Photo Keywords : mizar 
Advanced Vehicle Engineers (AVE) Mizar [1973] N68X Oxnard Airport, Oxnard, California - August 1973  Very few people ever heard of this unusual experimental aircraft but I happened to be at the Oxnard Airport one day while they were out performing tests on it. The AVE Mizar was the latest attempt at the creation of a viable flying automobile, or roadable aircraft -- a commuter aircraft design that has fueled the imagination of aeronautical engineers for decades. (The flying surfaces are to detach from the vehicle, allowing the pilot/driver to use the vehicle as it was intended.) However, this particular design -- a Ford Pinto outfitted with full flight controls and attached to the wings, rear engine and tail assembly of a Cessna Skymaster -- failed during a flight test on September 11, 1973, and was destroyed, killing both occupants.
ADVANCE VEHICLE ENGINEERS (AVE) MIZAR Oxnard Airport - August 1973  And I even got one of the Mizar taking off! What a coup this was!!! It's too bad I had to take it with my crappy old Vivitar 90-230mm telephoto zoom lens, but I got it anyway. There are few -- if any -- shots of this thing in the air.
ADVANCE VEHICLE ENGINEERS (AVE) "MIZAR" Oxnard Airport - August 1973  Very few people ever heard of this unusual experimental aircraft -- or much less even seen one -- but I happened to be at the Oxnard Airport one day while they were out performing tests on it. The AVE Mizar was the latest attempt at the creation of a viable flying automobile, or roadable aircraft, a commuter aircraft design that has fueled the imagination of aeronautical engineers for decades. (The flying surfaces are to detach from the vehicle, allowing the pilot/driver to use the vehicle as it was intended.) However, this particular design -- a Ford Pinto outfitted with full flight controls and attached to the wings, rear engine and tail assembly of a Cessna Skymaster -- failed during a flight test on September 11, 1973, and was destroyed.
Advanced Vehicle Engineers (AVE) Mizar [1973] N68X Oxnard Airport, California - August 1973  And I even got one of the Mizar taking off! What a coup this was!!! It's too bad I had to take it with my crappy old Vivitar 90-230mm telephoto zoom lens, but I got it anyway. There are very few shots of this thing in the air.
Advanced Vehicle Engineers (AVE) Mizar [1973] N68X Oxnard Airport, Oxnard, California - August 1973
Advanced Vehicle Engineers (AVE) Mizar [1973] N68X Oxnard Airport, Oxnard, California - August 1973  The Ford Pintos used for the AVE Mizar project (one for the flying model seen here; one for a static display model) were obtained through Galpin Ford (see license plate) in North Hills, California -- who are still in business after all these years! Through a video that has recently become available, I was able to find out that this particular Ford Pinto carried the California vehicle registration 689CXF. Check out the video showing this aircraft flying, as well as the story of one of its project mates by clicking here: www.cookieboystoys.com
Advanced Vehicle Engineers (AVE) Mizar [1973] N68X Oxnard Airport, Oxnard, California - August 1973  After rummaging around through all my old B/W negatives, I just couldn't stand it anymore and bought a slide/negative scanner so I could have more views of this remarkable aircraft. I'd forgotten I'd gotten so close to it.
Advanced Vehicle Engineers (AVE) Mizar [1973] N68X
Oxnard Airport, Oxnard, California - August 1973

Very few people ever heard of this unusual experimental aircraft but I happened to be at the Oxnard Airport one day while they were out performing tests on it. The AVE Mizar was the latest attempt at the creation of a viable flying automobile, or roadable aircraft -- a commuter aircraft design that has fueled the imagination of aeronautical engineers for decades. (The flying surfaces are to detach from the vehicle, allowing the pilot/driver to use the vehicle as it was intended.) However, this particular design -- a Ford Pinto outfitted with full flight controls and attached to the wings, rear engine and tail assembly of a Cessna Skymaster -- failed during a flight test on September 11, 1973, and was destroyed, killing both occupants.

Edit caption:


Save Cancel
Advanced Vehicle Engineers (AVE) Mizar [1973] N68X Oxnard Airport, Oxnard, California - August 1973  Very few people ever heard of this unusual experimental aircraft but I happened to be at the Oxnard Airport one day while they were out performing tests on it. The AVE Mizar was the latest attempt at the creation of a viable flying automobile, or roadable aircraft -- a commuter aircraft design that has fueled the imagination of aeronautical engineers for decades. (The flying surfaces are to detach from the vehicle, allowing the pilot/driver to use the vehicle as it was intended.) However, this particular design -- a Ford Pinto outfitted with full flight controls and attached to the wings, rear engine and tail assembly of a Cessna Skymaster -- failed during a flight test on September 11, 1973, and was destroyed, killing both occupants.
Advanced Vehicle Engineers (AVE) Mizar [1973] N68X
Oxnard Airport, Oxnard, California - August 1973

Very few people ever heard of this unusual experimental aircraft but I happened to be at the Oxnard Airport one day while they were out performing tests on it. The AVE Mizar was the latest attempt at the creation of a viable flying automobile, or roadable aircraft -- a commuter aircraft design that has fueled the imagination of aeronautical engineers for decades. (The flying surfaces are to detach from the vehicle, allowing the pilot/driver to use the vehicle as it was intended.) However, this particular design -- a Ford Pinto outfitted with full flight controls and attached to the wings, rear engine and tail assembly of a Cessna Skymaster -- failed during a flight test on September 11, 1973, and was destroyed, killing both occupants.

Edit caption:


Save Cancel
See photo in original gallery.